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Updated 16 September 2005

Vision and Framework for Strategy and Planning
Published August 2005

 

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Polylactide polymers (PLP) from biomass feedstocks, Cargill-Dow: Courtesy of DOE/NREL, Credit – Warren Gretz

 

Healthy Forest: Courtesy of DOE/NREL, Credit – U.S. Forest Service

 

Artist's Concept of FutureGen: U.S. Department of Energy

 

Cargill-Dow Biorefinery, Blair, Nebraska: Credit NETL

 

Geologic Sequestration drawing; Artist's Concept of FutureGen: U.S. Department of Energy

 

Pacific Ocean: Courtesy of DOE/NREL, Credit – Warren Gretz

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CCTP Goal 3: Capture and Sequester Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

Fossil fuels will likely remain a mainstay of global energy production well into the 21st century. Transforming fossil fuel-based combustion systems into low or carbon-free energy processes would enable the continued use of the world’s plentiful coal and other fossil energy resources. Such a transformation would require further development and application of technologies to capture CO2 and store it through safe and acceptable means, thus removing it permanently from the atmosphere. There are also large opportunities to remove CO2 directly from the atmosphere and sequester it on land or in oceans, including increased carbon storage through improved land-use, forest, and agricultural management practices; changes in products and materials; and other means. Two focus areas are important:

CO2 Capture and Storage.

Advanced techniques are under development that could capture CO2 from such sources as coal-burning power plants, oil refineries, hydrogen production facilities, and various high-emitting industrial processes. Carbon dioxide capture would be linked to geologic storage – permanent storage in geologic formations, such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep coal seams, saline reservoirs, or other deep injection reservoirs.

CO2 Sequestration.

Land-based, biologically assisted means for removing CO2 from the atmosphere and sequestering it in trees, soils, or other organic materials have proven to be low-cost means for long-term carbon storage. Ocean sequestration may also play a role as a carbon “sink,” as science advances the understanding of its efficacy and the potential effects.

 

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